Composite sculptures of 1890s American college students

From one of Hooton's books. The caption reads: 'Dr. Dudley A. Sargent's composite figures of college students of the "gay nineties." Made from average measurements. The present generation of American students is considerably taller and more slender.'
I forget which book this is from. Probably Up From the Apes, in which case "present generation" refers to the 1940s.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

There were women in the college's back then?

Anonymous said...

Guessedworker commented on Rushton and genital size. Dasein then mentioned your posts on the subject, and Guessedworker responded dismissively.

Anonymous said...

Now GW says that when it comes to "Rushton's superb thesis," the opinions of promiscuous women are more reliable and better evidence than scientific studies.

John Smith said...

for all our science, sustainability, healthy food research...the average american is likely less intelligent, overweight, and has a host of other self-imposed problems.

Anonymous said...

Leftist Negro though he may have been Frantz Fanon nailed GW: The average length of the penis among the black men of Africa, Dr. Pales says, rarely exceeds 120 millimeters (4.6244 inches). Testut, in his Traite d'anatomie humaine, offers the same figure for the European. But these are facts that persuade no one. The white man is convinced that the Negro is a beast.

n/a said...

First Anonymous,

Yes, mostly in women's colleges.

Second Anonymous,

It became clear to me long ago that, unfortunately, Guessedworker is scientifically illiterate (in addition to being subliterate in most other areas). There's not much to be done for it.

swanekj said...

These statues were presented in the anthropology/ethnology section of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. The exhibit text stated that they were based on a median of all measurements of 20,000 "prepatory" and university students taken shortly before the fair was originally supposed to open, in late 1892. Presumably, the vast majority of those sampled were white, because ethnologists of that era would not wish to "confuse an issue".